December 5, 2021

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Donald Trump's former spokeswoman claims slavery is 'good history' in Confederate statue debate

Donald Trump's former spokeswoman claims slavery is 'good history' in Confederate statue debateSlavery is good history are not four words one often hears uttered in the same sentence but Donald Trump’s former campaign spokesperson appears to think it is a plausible clause. Katrina Pierson, who was national campaign spokeswoman for President Trump during the election, made the assertion while attempting to defend the continued existence of Confederate statues in the US. Democrat leader Nancy Pelosi has been campaigning for the removal of Confederate statues in the wake of the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville which saw Neo-Nazis, KKK members, and “alt-right” activists descend on the Virginia city to protest the removal of such a statue there.


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Victim of his name, sportscaster Robert Lee pulled from Virginia game

Victim of his name, sportscaster Robert Lee pulled from Virginia gameTrying to avoid controversy at all costs, ESPN has created a big one. The US sports television network yanked Robert Lee as the announcer at a college football game because he has the same name as the Confederate general at the center of the violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month. The sportscaster was supposed to cover the University of Virginia's season opening game in Charlottesville on September 2.


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State Department science envoy's letter of resignation has a hidden message for the president

State Department science envoy's letter of resignation has a hidden message for the presidentA State Department science envoy's letter of resignation appears to have a hidden message for the president: "IMPEACH." Daniel M. Kammen, one of seven science envoys for the State Department, tweeted a photo of the coded letter of resignation on Wednesday morning. Kammen cited President Donald Trump's "failure to condemn white supremacists and neo-Nazis," and his response to a deadly "alt-right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia as the reason for stepping down.  SEE ALSO: Another one of Donald Trump's committees just resigned in protest The letter also alludes to Trump's stances on environmental issues, such as his decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement, in his letter.  "Your actions to date have, sadly, harmed the quality of life in the United States, our standing abroad, and the sustainability of the planet," he wrote.  Perhaps the most interesting part of the letter, however, is the way the first letter of each paragraph forms an acrostic that spells out "impeach." Mr. President, I am resigning as Science Envoy. Your response to Charlottesville enables racism, sexism, & harms our country and planet. pic.twitter.com/eWzDc5Yw6t — Daniel M Kammen (@dan_kammen) August 23, 2017 Science envoys have a number of roles within the government, but above all, they serve a foreign policy function by focusing "on issues of common interest in science, technology, and engineering fields." According to the State Department's website, they generally serve for one year.  Kammen's resignation letter with the acrostic highlighted in blue.Image: daniel kammen/mashableKammen is an energy expert at the University of California at Berkeley, who directs the school's Renewable and Appropriate Energy Lab. According to a recent article in the journal Nature, Kammen is among a group of scientists working with California Governor, and prominent Trump antagonist, Jerry Brown to create a major state-based climate and energy research program. He confirmed the letter in an email to Mashable and said he sent it to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and President Trump as well. Past science envoys include Jane Lubchenco, the former head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Ahmed Zewail, winner of the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Trump can't afford to lose any scientists from his administration, considering he lacks a White House science advisor, and has barely staffed the Office of Science and Technology Policy, which exists to advise the Executive Branch on science and engineering issues, among other tasks.   Kammen isn't the first to resign with such a flourish. On Aug. 18, the entire humanities and the arts council resigned with an acrostic that said "resist." WATCH: Neil deGrasse Tyson on all things Great American Eclipse


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